Canada history week

A series of animated shorts to commemorate the contribution of great Canadians on various topics. Series includes nine vignettes on topics ranging from reconciliation to global warming.

Produced for Historica Canada and Canadian Heritage.

Joey Angnatok, a community leader and fisherman from Labrador adapted his boat, the MV What’s Happening into an offshore marine research vessel. For more than a decade, he and his crew have taken scientists to measure sea ice and study climate change, while also sharing the traditional knowledge of Inuit communities.
For many years scientists believed that some kind of internal secretion of the pancreas was the key to preventing diabetes and controlling normal metabolism. No one could find it, until in the summer of 1921 a team at the University of Toronto began trying a new experimental approach suggested by Dr. Frederick Banting. By the spring of 1922, the Toronto researchers — Banting, Charles Best, J.B. Collip and their supervisor, J.J.R. Macleod, announced the discovery of insulin.
One of the longest and most violent labour conflicts in Quebec history, the 1949 Asbestos Strike paralyzed major mines in Quebec for almost five months. Journalist Gérard Pelletier is well known for his reporting on the Strike for Le Devoir.
Ursula Franklin was a physicist, educator, feminist and social activist who pioneered the development of archaeometry, which applies modern techniques of materials analysis to archaeology.
In 1945, the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters negotiated a collective bargaining agreement with the Canadian Pacific Railway that included salary increases, vacation and overtime pay. It also gave porters like Stanley G. Grizzle the right to wear name tags so that passengers would call them by their names.
Helen Armstrong was a labour activist who fought for the rights of working class women. She organized women workers in the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike and was one of only two women among some 50 men on the strike committee.

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